Welcome to the Misadventures of Widowhood blog!

In January of 2012 my soul mate of 42 years passed away after nearly 12 years of living with severe disabilities due to a stroke. I survived the first year after Don’s death doing what most widows do---trying to make sense of my world turned upside down. The pain and heartache of loss, my dark humor, my sweetest memories and, yes, even my pity parties are well documented in this blog.

Now that I’m a "seasoned widow" the focus of my writing has changed. I’m still a widow looking through that lens but I’m also a woman searching for contentment, friends and a voice in my restless world. Some people say I have a quirky sense of humor that shows up from time to time in this blog. Others say I make some keen observations about life and growing older. I say I just write about whatever passes through my days---the good, bad and the ugly. Comments welcome and encouraged. Let's get a dialogue going! Jean

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Home From Surgery

Back home from labrum tear shoulder surgery---labrum anchor put in (think hardware) and labrum 'band" restrung, bone spur removed, and arthritis smoothed out. Will have to wear a sling 4 weeks but can drive in a few days. Very little pain so far and doing good. Got to sleep sitting up for 2-3 nights.

My biggest problem is I screwed up my desk top computer a few hours before I went in---accidentally deleted a driver, can't get it back and can't get on the web without it. Next week I'll arrange a house call from my tech shop because I won't be able lift heavy stuff all winter.

Thanks for all the comments, well wishes, prayers and chants offered! They worked, and best of all my brain still works. I was worried it would come out like scrambled eggs.

And a big thanks to my niece who baby sat me and my others niece for her calls, etc.  They both went home tired from caring for an infant while his mother was getting the same surgery. The DIL had to stay in recovery an hour longer than the norm and I stayed under the norm so we left the place with in 15 min.

12 comments:

  1. So glad to hear from you that all is well. Now go slow, take care, rest…. you know the routine. :)

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  2. Jean,
    Good. Good. So glad you're on the other side of this. Things like this are always a little nerve-racking no matter what we tell ourselves before the event. I'm always relieved when it's over. I'm sure you are, too. Now the recovery.

    You said you have to sleep upright. Do you have a recliner that helps with that? We don't, but after an illness a few years ago that included breathing issues, I thought about the convenience of one.

    Be ever so careful and treat yourself tenderly. The rehabilitation is very important, but I'm sure you know that. Glad you're home.

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  3. Thank you, three! Sleeping upright proved harder than I thought so half way through the night I went to plan B for people without recliners,,,5 pillows to keep your upper body upright in bed. I see the doctor in 2 weeks to line up the rehab phase.

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  4. So glad the surgery went so smoothly and you only need to sleep sitting up for 2 - 3 nights. It's a bitch. I so wish I could deliver soup and sandwiches to you! Hang in there. Public bitching encouraged. Forget being brave and silent!

    Are you getting PT? Protocol is so different depending on what's done, but you'll be pretty weak after wearing the sling for four weeks. I'm amazed they've given you the go ahead to drive after a few days. I don't know diddlysquat about labrum tears, so I would certainly trust what they're telling you.. Still, let me be your nervous Nellie. Be careful driving. Avoid any reflex action out there on the road. In my shoulder surgery, the 4 anchors the surgeon put in merely tacked torn tissue down, until my tendons could knit to bone, a very, very slow process that takes up to six months. The anchor itself was not the 'fix', and would not hold things together if I - oops! - moved my arm. So I played it safe. Do take care!

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    1. I'm left-handed and the surgery was the right shoulder. I was paying attention to how I drive before the surgery and my right hand action is definitely is within the criteria of keeping my elbow at my waist. That rule will apply all winter but that will still allow a lot of freedom after the sling comes off. I'll get the therapy orders in 10 days with my follow up appointment. He told me it would be 7 months to get full range of motion back. I guess it really was a mess in there and we think it started back when I fell and broke my left elbow. Tears like that happen a lot when you fall on your stomach with your arm stretched out in front. Common injury for ball players slidinginf to a base.

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  5. I'm glad all went well and you're not in pain. That really rocks. Think how good you're going to feel when you're all healed up and done with physical therapy. It will be amazing.

    Have a fabulous day. :)

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  6. Glad to know that you are home from surgery and didn't need any of the information from your Living Will. Good luck with your recuperation. -Jean

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  7. Thanks. it's kind of funny what they did with the papers. They didn't take them to scan or anything. They put them under your gurney in case the surgical center has to rush you off in an ambulance for emergency care at a full service hospital. I was kind of sorry I asked. LOL

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  8. Jean :

    I am so happy your surgery is done & behind you now & everything went well. Now have to focus on therapy & recovery. I know you will do pretty well in that too. your organization skills amazes me. I used to think my hubby is very organized person, but man you beat me. I am surprised you went into artistic field instead of accounting field Asha

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    1. I'm glad too! I was actually good at math in college but I didn't have an interest in it.

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